Nude photos of women soldiers, child porn land Facebook in trouble

Nude photos of women soldiers, child porn land Facebook in trouble

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Nude photos of women soldiers, child porn land Facebook in trouble

Social networking giant Facebook has come under fire after it failed to take necessary action against child porn content being allegedly shared on its platform.

In an unprecedented move, instead of removing the said content, Facebook reported the ones ringing the alarm bells — BBC in this case — to the police.

The media organisation reportedly found 100 images which appeared to break Facebook’s guidelines and let the social network know about it. Of the 100 images, only 18 are said to have been taken down by Facebook’s content moderation system. The other 82 apparently did not breach its community standards, according to Facebook. What’s particularly baffling is when BBC reached out to Facebook’s policy director, Simon Milner for interview, he agreed but on one condition. That BBC share with him the images serving as background for their allegations.

When BBC shared the images with Milner, he reported the journalists involved to the UK police.

“The fact that Facebook sent images that had been sent to them, that appear on their site, for their response about how Facebook deals with inappropriate images…the fact that they sent those on to the police seemed to me to be extraordinary,” BBC’s director of editorial policy, David Jordan said.

“One can only assume that the Facebook executives were unwilling or certainly reluctant to engage in an interview or a debate about why these images are available on the Facebook site,” he added.

Moreover, BBC also found five convicted paedophiles with profiles: a clear violation of Facebook’s rules that forbid convicted sex offenders from having accounts. Even they weren’t apparently taken down by the social network when reported.

Facebook’s content moderation system has been in the news for all the wrong reasons lately. The most recent episode involves the Unites States Marine Corps wherein hundreds of nude photos of female service members were said to have been shared via a Marines United Facebook group.

Nudity or other sexually suggestive content is strictly not allowed on the platform. Should such content make its way on the social network in some way, Facebook offers a report button to viewers who accidentally stumble upon such content. In both the cases, however, Facebook seems to have been caught foot in mouth raising grave concerns over its moderation standards.