Eat dark chocolates to turn back the clock on ageing

Eat dark chocolates to turn back the clock on ageing

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Eat dark chocolates to turn back the clock on ageing

Winding back the clock has never been so delicious! A team of researchers has found that dark chocolates can reverse ageing.

Oxidative stress and inflammation increase with aging and are thought to play an important role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease.

In the study, researchers from the University of California San Diego School of Medicine show that the epicatechin, a flavanol found in foods such as dark chocolate, reduced damaging oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of aging.

Just two weeks of treatment with epicatechin not only suppressed levels of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation that would normally be increased in this mouse model, but also improved memory and anxiety levels in the mice.

The researchers say their results may help explain the beneficial effects on memory seen in people who consume dark chocolate.Israel Ramirez-Sanchez will present this research at the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics annual meeting on April 24.

Also,The findings showed that consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa products was associated with improvements in specific circulating biomarkers of cardiometabolic health. So, from now on replace desserts with dark chocolate.

’We found that cocoa flavanol intake may reduce dyslipidemia (elevated triglycerides), insulin resistance and systemic inflammation, which are all major subclinical risk factors for cardiometabolic diseases,’ said Simin Liu, Professor at Brown University in Rhode Islands, US. Did you know, dark chocolates could also improve your sex life? There were small-to-modest but statistically significant improvements among those who ate flavanol-rich cocoa product versus those who did not. The greatest effects were seen among trial volunteers who ate between 200 and 600 mg of flavanols a day (based on their cocoa consumption).

They had significant declines in blood glucose and insulin, as well as another indicator of insulin resistance called HOMA-IR. Further, they also saw an increase in HDL, or “good,” cholesterol. Participants who consumed higher doses saw some of the insulin resistance benefits and a drop in triglycerides, but not a significant increase in HDL. This means dark chocolate can also help in losing weight.